Thinking about ways to get my students to write poetry or just simply write, I got inspired by a photo I took of my plants for Instagram. I thought of the well-known nursery rhyme “How does your garden grow?” It’s simple and at the same time thought-provoking.

A few questions inmediately came to mind: How does your garden grow? Can a garden be compared to life in general? Do you let your garden be overrun with weeds? Who are the weeds in your life? Do they serve a purpose?

This would be either an excellent poetry exercise in which the students might find words to rhyme with weed, flowers, thorns, green, insects and so on, or a writing prompt to get them to reflect on people or situations in life.

It might be a good way to assess what my students are capable of writing. I could use it as a diagnostic exercise to introduce a poetry unit. The possibilties are endless. ~~~LMM

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Humor in the classroom:

It’s summer so it’s time to reflect on some of our teaching practices and what we can do to improve them. It’s a healthy activity and one that should be taken seriously but not so seriously that we berate ourselves for making some mistakes. After all, we’re only human.

One thing that any wise teacher should “seriously” consider is having fun in the classroom. Why not take advantage of humor to get your ideas across? I’ve listened to some comedy routines that could be used as grammar exercises.  Jerry Seinfeld has a skit dealing with the words “down” and “up”.  He says that as children we were always told to “sit down,” “settle down,” “quiet down” and “stay down” or  they were told to “sit up” straight, not to “stay up” late, and that they should “get up” early.

Comedy can also be used with debatable topics. What do most comedians usually do anyway?  They make fun of ordinary events. Things as simple as going to the grocery store or visiting the family doctor can turn into a hilarious situation. One popular topic that frequently pops up is that of food consumption.  Whether it be eating an ice cream cone on a hot summer day or baking cupcakes for the first time, there’s bound to be something laughable to discuss with a classmate or post on a blog.

When you have your students discuss daily activities that involve humor, the class seems to be more enjoyable.  Students will come away with a bit more knowledge and a healthy attitude towards life in general. So let’s “lighten up” a bit!~~LMMolina